Manualidad | Calabazas para Halloween

Por Sara Blázquez

Halloween ya está aquí, y en Cuento a la vista creemos que una buena forma de celebrarlo es con un cuento y una manualidad. Como cuento os proponemos ¡¡Demasiados caramelos!!, y como manualidad os presentamos esta fantástica calabaza, ideal para decorar cualquier fiesta de Halloween.

Es muy sencilla, adaptable a cualquier edad, y necesitamos poquitos materiales:

–    Un calcetín de media.
–    Aguja e hilo.
–    Tijeras.
–    Algodón.
–    Témperas de colores y pincel.

1. En primer lugar hacemos un nudo pequeño justo en la punta de calcetín y metemos el algodón; lo apretamos, damos algo de forma y lo ajustamos con un nudo.

2. A continuación volvemos a pasar el relleno por el calcetín girándolo, para que así quede envuelto dos veces.

3. Hacemos un nudo en el extremo y cortamos lo que nos sobra, pero sin pasarnos, porque eso será el rabo de la calabaza.

4. Lo siguiente que tenemos que hacer en atravesar con hilo y aguja de arriba abajo, apretándolo bien para dar forma. Esto lo hacemos tantas veces como queramos.

5. Por último solo nos queda pintar nuestra calabaza y ponerle ojos y boca, nosotras hemos utilizado gomaeva. En lo que respecta al color… podéis escoger el color que más os guste (¡hay calabazas de muchos colores!).

Si queréis le podéis dar un poco de cola blanca al rabito para darle forma y… ¡listo!

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El gusano que quería ser… un sujetapapeles


Por Sara Blázquez

Hoy en Cuento a la vista tenemos como invitado un gusano muy especial, no lleva bufanda ni sombrero como Lunares en El gusano que quería ser mariposa de seda, pero estamos convencidos de que os encantará.

Esta manualidad requiere pocos materiales, y además podemos adaptarla a cualquier edad. Necesitaremos:

– Una pinza de madera.
– Tres pompones de colores.
– Témperas y pincel.
– Cola o pegamento.
– Limpiapipas.
– Tijeras.
– Ojos móviles.

En primer lugar tenemos que pintar la pinza de madera del color que más nos guste, en este caso hemos utilizado témpera de color magenta para no repetir los colores de los pompones.

A continuación, cuando la pinza ya esté seca, echamos un poco de cola o pegamento por un lado y pegamos los pompones. Presionamos durante un momento para que se queden fijos y dejamos que se seque la cola.

Lo siguiente que tenemos que hacer es cortar dos trocitos del limpiapipas y retorcerlos un poco para hacerle unas antenas a nuestro gusanito. Clavamos los trocitos en el primer pompón sin miedo, ya que gracias al alambre se sujetarán perfectamente.

Por último, lo único que nos falta son los ojos. Si no tenemos ojos móviles podemos hacer unos nosotros mismos (con gomaeva, cartulina…). Solo tenemos que pegar los ojos en el primer pompón y… ¡listo!

The Anger of the Waves

Texto por María Bautista
Traducción por Dani Moore
Ilustración por Raquel Blázquez

Chapter 1

The door of the sand castle opened and Carla saw a dragon looking bored laying on a mat, a freckled princess playing with a ball, and a clueless prince dancing around with a floatie. The three were in a room with large stately windows, which, however, were very dirty and messy. There were plastic bags cluttering the room, banana peels and cigarette butts…instead of a castle, it looked like a pigsty!

None of the three inhabitants of the castle appeared to realize Carla’s presence, so she coughed and exclaimed:

– Hello. Can you see me?

The princess, the dragon and the prince looked at her surprised:

– A girl?
– It cannot be! It has been centuries since we have seen one!

Carla suddenly felt all their gazes fall on her, and a bunch of questions rained down on her: What’s your name? How did you get here? Do you know that the waves can destroy us? Will more kids come now? How old are you? Do you like to swim? Did you make this castle?

Carla thought that if someone had questions to ask it was she…she was inside a sand castle! That was incredible. But until she quenched the curiosity of the dragon and the prince and princess, she could not ask any questions. She thus learned that the princess was named Philomena and was the oldest of the tree. Then there was the dragon Misifú, which before breathing fire from its mouth, had been a cat. The youngest was the prince Galindo who was born inside of a shell and so his hair was curly and rebellious.

– We have always lived in sand castles. When one is destroyed, we go to another and so on. Sometimes it’s tiring changing homes so many times!
– Nor is it fun – exclaimed the prince.
– Well, it was more fun when more kids came to see us. Now…we spend the day without knowing what to do!

Carla felt like suggesting to them that if they did not have anything to do…they could dedicate themselves to cleaning their castle! Incredibly gross!

– I know what you are thinking – exclaimed the princess when she saw Carla look around with a disgusted face – but this trash isn’t ours. Before, our castles were clean and many kids came with shells and seaweed that left our rooms beautiful. Now, no kids come, nor do we have shells, but in exchange we have these mountains of rubbish everywhere. It is the trash that people leave on the beach.
– And as we clean…there always appear new things!
– Punctured floaties, forgotten sand buckets, lost flip flops, finished soda cans, half-eaten fruit, foil with melted cheese and the most disgusting of all: cigarette butts! It’s repugnant…
– So much so that the waves, enraged, began to destroy castles with kids inside to see if their parents would learn…but the only thing that followed was that kids stopped coming to see us!

So that was the motive for which the waves became angry: they did not want there to be so much garbage on the beaches!

– Ay! If you could lend us a hand… – exclaimed the dragon suddenly.
– Me? What can I do? I cannot talk to the waves and neither can I alone clean all the trash on the beach.
– Yes, but you can tell everyone what is happening to us.
– And remind them that they have to take care of the beach…we don’t want trash castles! We prefer sand castles.

Carla also preferred sand castles, so she promised to help them before saying goodbye. She could not stay much longer…the waves could destroy the castle and she would disappear transformed into nine grains of sand. So Carla left her shells, her bunch of seaweed and a bit of salt water and left the castle. She wished hard to return to being a big girl. She wished and wished and wished and when she opened her eyes, her grandmother Federica looked at her curiously.

– Carla! Tell me about your experience! Do the princess Philomena, the prince Galindo, and the dragon Misifú still live in the castle?

Carla recounted all of what had occurred. As well, the problem that the sand castles had with the trash that people left on the beach.

– This is why the waves have become angry; we have to do something.

Grandmother Federica, after much thought, exclaimed:

– We have to create a story!
– A story?
– Of course! If we write a story, the kids will read it and will learn of what is happening on the beaches. And it won’t let parents leave cigarette butts and trash on the sand or in the ocean!

And it was so that bore the story that grandmother Federica and Carla told to their neighbor Valerie, who told her brother Ishmael who told his friend Alejo, who told his cousin Mercedes, who talked with her daughter Vega, who decided to tell her aunt Marieta, who recounted it to her friend Raquel. And between them all they wrote this story that you are now reading.

With this story, many people have learned of what happens with sand castles. So, with luck, soon there will be no trash on the beach and the waves will no longer be angry with us. And maybe very soon, the children will return to the sand castles to the delight of princess Philomena, the dragon Misifú, and the prince Galindo who will return to wonderful castles full of shells and seaweed.

Can you imagine?

Who Lives in the Sand Castles?

Texto por María Bautista
Traducción por Dani Moore
Ilustración por Raquel Blázquez

After a long day at the beach, Carla finished her sand castle and contemplated it with satisfaction. Carla loved to construct buildings from sand with her bucket and her shovel. Sometimes the towers of the castles were mountains full of dimples, others, square towers so perfect and smooth like the concrete buildings of the city.

But, what Carla loved most was to imagine who would live in the sand castles that we build on the beach. That day, her grandmother Federica observed her castle, stroked her curly head and, with the expression she always wore when she was about to tell an amazing story, exclaimed:

– Well who is going to live in the sandcastles: princes, princesses and dragons!

Carla looked at her grandmother not understanding; how could she know such a thing? Perhaps she had visited a sand castle some time? Grandmother Federica told her that a time long ago, when the kids constructed sand castles on the beach, they could, if they grabbed four shells, a bunch of seaweed, and a little bit of salt water, enter the castles that they built.

– But, how? The castles are small and we are so big!
– Very easily, Carla: we become small, as small as nine grains of sand placed on top of each other.
– And what do we do with the shells, the bunch of seaweed and the salt water?
– Those are the gifts that we give to the habitants of the castle. When they see us arrive with all that, they open the door and allow us to enter their castles.
– And you have been in a sand castle one time? – the young girl asked excitedly.
– Well of course, many times. Before, it was in style and everyone did it, until one day, no one knows well why, the waves became angry and began to destroy the castles while the kids were still inside. And the kids…disappeared like the sand castles!

Carla looked at her sand castle and checked as the waves were coming closer timidly. If they continued nearing, they would destroy her precious square towers and the castle would become a mountain of sand. Why would those waves do that?

Carla was thinking about it for days and, although she asked her grandmother, she was unable to say why the waves had angered with the children that visited the sand castles. And such was her curiosity that one morning at the beach, she had a plan:

– Grandma, would you help me enter a sand castle?
– But Carla, this is very dangerous! If the waves crash over you while you are inside…we will never see you again!

But Carla had already thought of this: to begin they would make the castle far from the shore, so that the waves needed more time to destroy it.

– I will not keep long, grandma, just long enough to discover why the waves got angry with the kids and their sand castles.

Although grandmother Federica was not totally with her, she relented. In reality, she was also feeling curious to discover why the waves had gotten mad. So, bucket and shovel in hand, the grandmother and Carla constructed a precious sand castle. When they finished, both searched for four shells from the beach, a bunch of seaweed and a small glass of seawater.

– Now you are ready, Carla. You only have to desire it strongly.

Carla closed her eyes and began to wish to be so small as to be able to enter the sand castle. In a moment, Carla felt a brief dizziness and began to see how grandmother Federica and the colorful umbrellas on the beach were growing bigger and she was becoming smaller and smaller. Also, the castle had become much larger. So much so that it no longer seemed like a sand castle, but rather a colossal stone building.

Carla grabbed her bag where she carried the shells, seaweed and seawater (and which had become as small as her) and called to the door of the castle.

In that moment, the heavy door of the castle opened and a sound of trumpets and a sharp chirp bid her welcome. Excited, Carla entered into the sand castle.

Will she achieve her goal?

Chapter 2

The House of Horrors

Texto por María Bautista
Traducción por Dani Moore
Ilustración por Raquel Blázquez

Tito was waiting impatiently for the arrival of Friday. That day he was to leave for an outing at the amusement park. Tito wanted to take a ride on everything: the Swings, the Pirate Ship, the Shoot the Chute and the Tilt-a-Whirl.

– On everything? Even the House of Horrors? – Thomas asked him craftily.

Thomas was Tito’s older brother and passed the day cracking jokes: he hid all the pairs of socks so that Tito had to go out with mismatched ones, he moved the toys around so that Tito could not find them, he exchanged Tito’s colored pencils for black pencils, and he put tape on the scissors so that Tito could not open them. Thomas always laughed at him because he was small, so Tito tried showing him that now he was older and said convinced:

– Well, of course. Those things do not frighten me….

But when Tito entered the haunted house and saw those vampires with sharp fangs, long manes and red eyes, green hairy monsters, toothless witches, and werewolves howling nonstop, he was so scared that he could not sleep without having nightmares for the next three nights.

From then on, Thomas’ pranks changed. One night, while Tito was brushing his teeth, Thomas hid underneath the bed and when his brother was wrapped up in bed reading, he began to hit the mattress.

– Tock, tock, tock
– What is that sound? Who is down there?
– Tock, tock, tock…the vampire from the house of horrors has come to see you!

When Tito, very scared, began to whimper, Thomas came out from his hiding place in fits of laughter:

– How can you be so naïve! Vampires don’t exist.

He repeated that prank every once in a while. Sometimes, Thomas was the Boogeyman, others an evil witch that came to turn Tito into a rat, others a green monster that was tired of sleeping on the floor and wanted to seize Tito’s bed. And the joke always ended the same, with Thomas bursting with laughter and Tito very scared:

– But Tito…monsters do not exist!

But Tito did not believe him. To begin, if those beings did not exist, who were those that he had seen in the House of Horrors? Further, if there were so many books about monsters, witches, ghosts, vampires and wolves…how could they not exist? So, one day Tito decided to talk with Mom.

– Of course monsters exist, but they only have powers in books.
– But…what about the ones in the amusement park?
– Those are the evil beings that, one day, tired of the books, decided to leave their stories. But when they left the books they discovered that they did not have powers anymore and, even more, they were so ugly that everyone banished them to the streets.
– And what did they do?
– Well, the monsters decided to go to the barbershop to see if cutting their green, blue, and purple hairs would scare people less.
– And the vampires?
– Well, they went to the dentist; they wanted to get rid of those fangs!
– So then, now they are normal people?
– No way! As much as they tried to rid themselves of their monster appearances, they could not. So they stay in the House of Horrors in order to remain there without anyone banishing them to the streets.
– So all of those monsters in the amusement park are real?
– Of course, but they cannot do anything. Without the books, they do not have powers.

That night, when Thomas, hidden beneath his bed, started making noises, Tito was not bothered.

– If you are a real monster and you have escaped from a story…you do not scare me because you have no powers! And if you are Thomas…well you do not scare me either! So leave me be to read.

And although Thomas tried to convince him that there truly was a monster, there was no way to scare Tito. For he finally understood that the monsters, the witches, the vampires, and the ghosts were only evil in stories.

The blue ball of yarn

Texto por María Bautista
Traducción por Dani Moore
Ilustración por Raquel Blázquez

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The little Marilo walked hand in hand with her mom through the antique market in the city. Finally it was getting cold and Mom searched for an old wall clock like the one that was in her house when she was a child. Marilo carried in one hand a small umbrella and with the other clutched Mom tightly afraid to get lost in those hallways full of junk.

And it was so that to Marilo, the antique market was scary, with all of those odd old objects, full of dust and memories:

1. The cuckoo clocks, with those disturbing birds that awake at each hour.
2. The porcelain dolls, with those window-like eyes and the complexion as cold as the skin of the dead (or so Marilo thought that they would have skin like the dead, because see, she had never seen one).
3. The headboards with female figures with strange hairstyles.
4. The tables with a smell of dried wood and drawers in which no one know what you could find.

But all of a sudden, something in between all of those antique stands called her attention. It was a stall full of vivid colors.

– What is this? – Marilo asked an old wrinkled woman who weaved with two huge needles.
– They are scarves, colorful scarves. Don’t you think that this market is very gray?

Marilo agreed while she felt Mom’s hand pulling her away from there. The old wrinkled lady continued talking in her soft voice

– Do you want to try one on?

Marilo, enthusiastically began to rummage through those stupendous scarves of brilliant colors.

– This one!
– Blue is also my favorite color – exclaimed the old woman. – Try it on to see how it looks on you…

Marilo wrapped the blue scarf around her neck and then felt lightheaded. She closed her eyes trying not to fall and when they opened, the plaza where the antique market had been was completely empty.

– Where are you Mom? And the scarf lady? Where is everyone?

Marilo ran scared and turned down the first street that she found. Was it her imagination or did those houses appear monstrous with enormous doors – mouths that could devour her? She raised her umbrella as if it were a sword and tried to protect herself from those house-monsters.

– Back, back, don’t you come any closer, leave me alone!

But the door-mouths of those houses were becoming larger and larger, until a door slam-bite tucked her inside one of those houses.

Marilo tried to search for window-eyes to escape through, but soon she realized that she could not walk, something was pulling her from behind: the blue scarf that the old woman had given her was caught on the door knob-tongue.

– Stupid scarf! It’s all your fault…

So she pulled and pulled until the blue scarf was frayed, tangled in the door knob-tongue of that horrible house-monster. When Marilo was about to convert the scarf into a simple ball of yarn without any form, a shrill sound surprised her.

– Cliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiing!

The door-mouth opened suddenly and right next to her, Marilo saw two kids her age dressed as ghosts.

– Happy Halloween! Trick or Treat!

Marilo looked at her side and discovered that the house-monster had disappeared and in its place she found the comfortable living room of her house. Had she dreamt it all up?

Then she saw a blue ball of yard thrown about the floor.

Definitely, on Halloween even the strangest things can become reality…

Hucha cerdito

Por Sara Blázquez

En Cuento a la Vista nos encantan los cerditos, así que esta es una manualidad que se puede complementar con cualquiera de nuestros cuentos dedicados a ellos. Con esta hucha enseñamos a los más peques de la casa lo importante que resulta aprender a ahorrar, y además lo hacemos recordándoles que hay que reciclar.

Se trata de una manualidad que podemos adaptar a cualquier edad; en cualquier caso, recomendamos que sea un adulto quien haga la ranura para las monedas.

Vamos a necesitar:

– Una botella de plástico pequeña (pero de tapón ancho, para que podamos sacar las monedas después).
– Tijeras.
– Pinturas acrílicas/témperas mezcladas con cola.
– Cuatro trocitos de corcho.
– Gomaeva.
– Un trocito de limpiapipas.
– Cola/pegamento.

En primer lugar hacemos la ranura para las monedas con la ayuda de unas tijeras o un cúter. Después damos una mano de pintura blanca (mezclada con cola si utilizamos témperas) para que al pintar de color nuestro cerdito no queden zonas transparentes.

Una vez seco lo volvemos a pintar del color que más nos guste (en este caso ya no hace falta mezclar las témperas con la cola). Mientras se seca hacemos unos ojos y unas orejas en gomaeva o en cualquier otro material que tengamos por casa, como cartón. Enroscamos un trocito de limpiapipas en espiral para hacer el rabito.

Para terminar, cuando nuestra hucha ya esté seca, le pegamos los ojos, las orejas, y los cuatro trocitos de corcho a modo de patas. Hacemos un pequeño agujerito en la parte de atrás para colocar el rabito y… ¡listo!

The love of the rain and the sun

Texto por María Bautista
Traducción por Dani Moore
Ilustración por Brenda Figueroa

There was a time when seasons did not exist. There was no flowering spring, no scorching summer, no nostalgic fall nor frozen winter. The trees mixed their flowers with their fruits, their yellow leaves with bare branches and on the same day it could rain and freeze, be freezing cold or have the most grueling heats.

During this time everyone went a little crazy with so much change in the weather. The snails extended their antennae towards the sun, to soon feel the rain on their spiral shells. The bears were about to hibernate during the cold and, before they had fallen asleep, they were already dying of heat in the depths of their cave. Everyone was clueless but as there were no rules, they all lived happily in absolute chaos.

The sun and the rain were also clueless, concentrated on something much more important than the weather, the animals or the trees: love. See, the sun and the rain, in this crazy time without seasons, had fallen in love. And as this time was one of firsts, the love between the sun and the rain was new, intense and overwhelming.

At first they met at the dawns, when everyone was still sleeping. For a few minutes the sun shone strong and the rain filled the leaves and fields with water. In time, the lovers felt more and more need to be together. Dawns became mornings and mornings became noons and afternoons.

But in this world of chaos where there were no seasons, no one was surprised that it rained while the sun came out at the same time, after all, this was a world without rules and everything was allowed.

However, one day the lovers went too far. In love as they were, the hours together passed them by in an instant, little did they know. Hence one afternoon when the sun was preparing to set, to disappear until the next morning, the rain felt the desire to have a moment more with the sun by its side.

– You can’t leave so soon! Stay with me a couple of hours more.

And the sun, moved by the sweetness of the rain could not say no. That day the sun set two hours later but nobody said anything: in that world without rules where everything was allowed.

Day after day, the lovers scratched hours off the night until it completely disappeared from the world. This provoked the biggest chaos that anyone had ever seen in this world already filled with chaos. The animals could not get to sleep, the land was flooded and the flowers were dying from too much sun and heat. Not to mention that the moon and stars had been left without work. Very upset, the moon began to ask for explanations from everyone who lived on the planet.

– Does anyone know who has organized such a mess? Without the night there is no need for the moon or the stars, where do you suppose I should go now? – the moon growled irritated at the top of the sky.

And after much questioning and investigating, the moon learned of the romance between the sun and the rain and of how this overflowing love had stolen the night. Very angry, the moon surprised them one night that was not night but rather day:

– You two aren’t ashamed of yourselves for having left the entire world without the night? – the moon yelled indignantly.

– Well this is a world without rules and here everything is allowed – exclaimed the sun proudly.

– Sure, as long as we do not disturb others. And your nocturnal adventures perturb the animals that cannot sleep, and lull the trees and flowers to sleep with so much water and heat. More so, what about the stars and myself? What will we do without the night? Have you stopped to think for a second what will become of us?

The rain and the sun hung their heads in shame. Surely they had not thought about this. They only had thoughts of their love and their feelings and everything else was not important. But that had to change.

And so it did change. The moon took charge of it and ordered the lovers to stop with those encounters. From this moment, the rain was always accompanied by a gray, sad sky. The sun, meanwhile, stopped traveling with the clouds. If these clouds appeared it was to create shade, but they never brought the rain, not like before.

It was a sad time, this one. In spite of that, the seasons were born and the animals and plants stopped going crazy from so much change of weather. However, everyone felt a little bit responsible for the sun and the rain, separated forever.

– Something must be done. It is too cruel to the rain and the sun.

After much insistence, the moon had to concede.

– You may reunite every once in a while, and always for short periods of time. But in exchange, for each meeting, you have to give us something as beautiful as your love.

The rain and the sun accepted. They returned to their encounters, and the world returned to being happy. The rain and the sun also fulfilled their promise.

They created something as beautiful as their love: the rainbow.

Hoy damos vida a la rana Ritita

Por Sara Blázquez

Parece que todavía no termina de llegar el calorcito, pero pronto empezará un largo verano y olvidaremos la nieve, la lluvia, las tormentas… Es posible que entonces Ritita tenga que volver a dejar su querida charca para irse a buscar la lluvia.

Hoy, para complementar la lectura del cuento La rana que fue a buscar la lluvia, vamos a dar vida a nuestra Ritita particular.

Se trata de una manualidad pensada para los más peques de la casa (cuidado a la hora de recortar) y únicamente necesitaremos:

– Pinturas.
– Tijeras.
– Pegamento.
– Plantilla de rana que os adjuntamos.

Lo primero que vamos a hacer es colorear nuestra ranita; podemos hacerlo directamente sobre la plantilla o calcar la silueta en otro folio o cartulina.

A continuación debemos recortar la silueta (¡aviso a navegantes! las líneas de puntos son para doblar el dibujo, no para recortarlo por ahí).

Por último, doblamos nuestra ranita por las líneas de puntos (el rectángulo inferior sirve como soporte para que la rana se sostenga de pie) y pegamos las partes que lo necesiten (la parte de arriba de las patitas, los ojos y el sombrero) y… ¡listo!

Avistamos cuento: Gorigori

Por María Bautista


Gorigori
Autora: María Jesús Jabato
Editorial: Kalandraka
IV Premio Internacional Ciudad de Orihuela de Poesía para niños
Formato: 15 x 23,5 cm.
Encuadernación: Cartoné
ISBN: 978 84 15250 68 5
32 páginas
PVP: 14 €
A partir de 7 años

La poesía infantil es un género que reporta muchos beneficios a los pequeños. Es divertida, da pie a jugar y memorizar y despierta una sensibilidad especial hacia la palabra y sus significados. Pero si además la poesía va acompañada de un poco de historia de arte, el libro se convierte en una aventura cultural que lejos de ser aburrida, se convierte en un juego para los pequeños. 

Este es el planteamiento de Gorigori, el libro que fue galardonado el pasado otoño con el IV Premio Internacional de Orihuela de Poesía para niños. María Jesús Jabato, su autora, da un paseo a través de la poesía por las salas de un museo que nos muestra algunas de las grandes obras de la historia del arte. 

El libro consta de 48 poemas inspirados en grandes clásicos, como Velázquez  o en pintores modernos e imprescindibles como Antonio López, Paul Klee o Edgar Degas. 

Un libro que permitirá a los pequeños acercarse al arte sin alejarse de la poesía como un juego, con versos que recuerdan a Juan Ramón Jiménez o a Lorca y sus canciones popular. 

Círculos de aire y rosas,
la bailarina
es seda cuando mueve
sus zapatillas,

Un poemario que se sale del libro para llevarnos de visita a un museo extraordinario.